8 Things You Should Know Before Replacing Your Engine

The bad news (that you already got) is that you need to replace your engine. The good news is that replacing your engine doesn’t need to break the bank. Quality used engines are an excellent cost saving alternative to often cost prohibitive new and remanufactured choices.  You can save even more if an engine changeover is something you can do yourself. If you’re a DIY about to replace your engine, check out these 8 tips for a smooth, successful job:

  1. Find and fix the root problem.  Engines fail for a reason.  Did it overheat? Did the timing belt fail?  Was there water in the oil?  If something caused your engine to fail and you don’t solve that problem, your new engine won’t last long. Don’t forget to check and resolve any codes in the computer.
  2. Inspect your new engine.  Pay attention to sensors, brackets, and all the other bolt on parts. Your new engine was inspected and interchanged and is the right part for your car. All those little parts were not.  Compare them to the parts on your old engine and change over anything that may be different.
  3.  Replace the timing belt, gaskets, and seals.  If your new engine has a timing belt, now is the time to replace it.  Check and replace the gaskets and seals as needed. These are jobs that are quick and easy when the motor is out, and hard and expensive when it’s in. Remember to check the manual on proper timing.
  4. Don’t forget to flush. Debris left over in the engine oil cooling system can damage your replacement engine. Don’t forget to replace the engine oil cooler and flush those cooler lines.
  5. Replace belts, hoses, clamps spark plugs and thermostat.  They don’t last forever. Take this opportunity to replace them.
  6. Be careful not to drop anything inside your new engine.  It sounds stupid I know, but we see a couple returns every year where a bolt or nut found it’s way down an intake.
  7. Don’t forget the oil change. Your new engine was drained before sale. Remember to change the filter and replace the oil.
  8. Watch that temperature. An engine replacement is a big job.  Mistakes can happen. Watch your engine closely the first time you run it. Monitor for leaks and watch that temperature gauge.  Remember, overheating isn’t covered by your warranty.

If your next DIY project is an engine replacement,  add these 8 steps to your R&R checklist. You’ll be glad you did.  And if you have any questions about your new engine, just give us a call.

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